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912 Cole Street s 297 S.F. CA 94117

Studies have shown that a child's motivation to learn serves as a critical element in the education process, yet student motivation shows a significant linear decrease from 3rd grade through 8th grade. Math Think offers a unique approach to math & science education by providing kids with tangible links between the science of everyday life and the world of mathematics to successfully stimulate a child's motivation to learn!


 a partner with k12think

Welcome. Math Think a non profit 501 c

Math Think takes the fundamental principles of education and applies them to today's digital world. Using cutting-edge technology, and DIRECT instruction we establish true growth in student learning.

Our programs concentrate on science, technology, engineering and math-related educational and career opportunities.

We have a team of child education professionals, each with more than a decade of experience. We cover all grade levels k-12, we have grown exponentially over the years serving over 4900 students across four states. The organization has formed partnerships with various agencies including faculty at the University of California and National Hispanic University to develop a set of bilingual curriculum designed to support ELL students. 

This work is urgent as scores from the most recent Nation’s Report Card show that only 44 percent of low-income students achieved a basic understanding of math while 71 percent of average-income students achieved the same level. A negative attitude could be to blame.

Worldwide studies also show that girls score better in math than boys, yet don’t pursue STEM or other math-related careers like boys. By adopting a growth mindset, more girls may begin to see math careers as challenging and fun. For example, in an important study researchers found that when mothers told their daughters they were not good at math in school, their daughter’s achievement declined almost immediately (Eccles & Jacobs, 1986). In a new study neuroscientists Erin Maloney and colleagues found that parents’ math anxiety reduced their children’s learning of math across grades 1 and 2, but only if parents helped their children on math homework (Maloney, Ramirez, Gunderson, Levine, & Beilock, 2015) If they did not help them on homework, the parents’ math anxiety did not detract from their children’s learning.


In grades 4 through 8 from 2013 to 2015 only 1 State and the District of Columbia shown any gain in Mathematics scores, with the majority on the states showing no improvement in scoring and over 15 states showing a decline in Mathematical scores.